Apsalar Becomes Certified Twitter Mobile Measurement Marketing Platform Partner for App Promotion Ads

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Apsalar (http://www.apsalar.com), the leading enterprise mobile attribution intelligence platform, announced today that it has added tracking attribution capabilities for Twitter Mobile App Promotion campaigns. Apsalar clients will now be able to measure the performance of Twitter campaigns in driving app installs and key in-app user behaviors such as retention, engagement, and revenue.

Apsalar’s mobile measurement intelligence platform currently manages over 1.75 billion device profiles across 25,000+ apps. Leading brands including NaturalMotion, 7-Eleven, LivingSocial, and 1-800-Flowers.com leverage Apsalar’s technology for their mobile measurement and audience management.

“Twitter has unique insight into the interests and behaviors of their user base. Our clients have found success being able to target the right audience at the right time with Twitter Mobile App Promotion,” said Michael Oiknine, CEO of Apsalar. “At Apsalar, our focus has always been to help advertisers understand and optimize their marketing spend across a multitude of channels. We’re excited to partner with Twitter, enabling mutual clients to leverage our best-in-class measurement solutions.”

About Apsalar:

Apsalar provides mobile measurement user intelligence solutions for enterprise marketers, allowing them to understand the effectiveness of mobile marketing efforts and user lifetime value. With Apsalar, app marketers unify cross-platform data to enrich mobile user profiles, analyze their most valuable mobile audiences and segment for retargeting or monetization. Apsalar has raised $17M from top-tier venture capital firms including DCM, Thomvest Ventures, Battery Ventures, and DN Capital.

Twitter® is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc.

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Apsalar Becomes Certified Twitter Mobile Measurement Marketing Platform Partner for App Promotion Ads

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Apsalar (http://www.apsalar.com), the leading enterprise mobile attribution intelligence platform, announced today that it has added tracking attribution capabilities for Twitter Mobile App Promotion campaigns. Apsalar clients will now be able to measure the performance of Twitter campaigns in driving app installs and key in-app user behaviors such as retention, engagement, and revenue.

Apsalar’s mobile measurement intelligence platform currently manages over 1.75 billion device profiles across 25,000+ apps. Leading brands including NaturalMotion, 7-Eleven, LivingSocial, and 1-800-Flowers.com leverage Apsalar’s technology for their mobile measurement and audience management.

“Twitter has unique insight into the interests and behaviors of their user base. Our clients have found success being able to target the right audience at the right time with Twitter Mobile App Promotion,” said Michael Oiknine, CEO of Apsalar. “At Apsalar, our focus has always been to help advertisers understand and optimize their marketing spend across a multitude of channels. We’re excited to partner with Twitter, enabling mutual clients to leverage our best-in-class measurement solutions.”

About Apsalar:

Apsalar provides mobile measurement user intelligence solutions for enterprise marketers, allowing them to understand the effectiveness of mobile marketing efforts and user lifetime value. With Apsalar, app marketers unify cross-platform data to enrich mobile user profiles, analyze their most valuable mobile audiences and segment for retargeting or monetization. Apsalar has raised $17M from top-tier venture capital firms including DCM, Thomvest Ventures, Battery Ventures, and DN Capital.

Twitter® is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc.

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Why You Must Message Customers as Thoughtfully as You Do Friends

Mobile now influences 19 percent of all retail sales. This creates both a huge risk and once-in-a-lifetime opportunity if marketers can get their mobile strategy right. As we head toward 2015, we’re seeing more brands than ever adopt a “mobile-first” strategy. Marketers who want to share screen time with their customers had better make sure their content contains actual substance, or they will verge upon a difficult and dangerous gray area between a great message and “spammy” one.

Get a handle on spam. For mobile marketers, there are three types of spam to avoid.

First, because this is actually illegal, you will run into trouble delivering messages to customers who didn’t knowingly agree to receive your marketing email. You can provoke rampant frustration by exceeding the number of messages you promised to deliver. This might be be forgivable if the content is relevant, but you can get into serious trouble with the Mobile Marketing Association for doing this.

The most difficult spam to avoid is the most prevalent type — anything your mobile customers they aren’t excited to get. This might be anything from delivering a message with irrelevant content to one that arrives at an awkward time.

Related: Creating Spam-Free E-Mail 

This type of spam will not cause legal problems but it definitely could create customer problems that damage your brand. Your customers recognize this spam when they see it. They will react by eventually opting out or, worse, sharing their negative experience with others.

Here are three pillars of mobile messaging you can use to ensure your message is relevant:

1. Time. Mobile is the only marketing medium where you get to choose exactly when your audience notices and engages with your content, with prime real estate space like the lock screen. This control means you can now insert yourself into the purchase process with a level of precision unheard of in the past.

2. Location. Your content also needs to take location into account. Think about where your audience is when they receive your message. Teenagers are likely to be in a different place than professional wedding planners. Your content should differ if your audience will be at home or at work.

3. Participation. Make sure your message resonates with your audience and they can do something to engage with it. Every message you send should be memorable to your mobile audience.

Related: How Not to Be a Spammer When Marketing Your Business

Remember, your audience is made up of actual people. Think of the last time you texted a friend You probably thought about what they were doing and where they were before you sent the message. Do the same for your audience. Try talking to them like they’re your friends. By keeping in mind that your audience are people, not statistics, you will avoid content that seems spammy to them.

Personalization is possible at scale. Rather than thinking of an individual person, think of the characteristics of the audience you’re trying to reach. If you’re texting young moms, make sure you speak to them like you would speak to young moms.

As a consumer, I view my favorite brands as more than just companies. They’re almost friends. My relationship with them goes way beyond the utility they provide. I can sense their company culture with every interaction. My Jeep is a means of transportation but the fact that other Jeep owners wave to me on the road takes my relationship with the brand to another level.

We all know spam when we see it. You can avoid being “that brand” by making your messages relevant and useful. If you do this, you can stand out from the madding crowd. Your audience will listen to you when you become like a friend.

Related: Five Tips for Better Text-Message Marketing 

More From Entrepreneur

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Why You Must Message Customers as Thoughtfully as You Do Friends

Mobile now influences 19 percent of all retail sales. This creates both a huge risk and once-in-a-lifetime opportunity if marketers can get their mobile strategy right. As we head toward 2015, we’re seeing more brands than ever adopt a “mobile-first” strategy. Marketers who want to share screen time with their customers had better make sure their content contains actual substance, or they will verge upon a difficult and dangerous gray area between a great message and “spammy” one.

Get a handle on spam. For mobile marketers, there are three types of spam to avoid.

First, because this is actually illegal, you will run into trouble delivering messages to customers who didn’t knowingly agree to receive your marketing email. You can provoke rampant frustration by exceeding the number of messages you promised to deliver. This might be be forgivable if the content is relevant, but you can get into serious trouble with the Mobile Marketing Association for doing this.

The most difficult spam to avoid is the most prevalent type — anything your mobile customers they aren’t excited to get. This might be anything from delivering a message with irrelevant content to one that arrives at an awkward time.

Related: Creating Spam-Free E-Mail 

This type of spam will not cause legal problems but it definitely could create customer problems that damage your brand. Your customers recognize this spam when they see it. They will react by eventually opting out or, worse, sharing their negative experience with others.

Here are three pillars of mobile messaging you can use to ensure your message is relevant:

1. Time. Mobile is the only marketing medium where you get to choose exactly when your audience notices and engages with your content, with prime real estate space like the lock screen. This control means you can now insert yourself into the purchase process with a level of precision unheard of in the past.

2. Location. Your content also needs to take location into account. Think about where your audience is when they receive your message. Teenagers are likely to be in a different place than professional wedding planners. Your content should differ if your audience will be at home or at work.

3. Participation. Make sure your message resonates with your audience and they can do something to engage with it. Every message you send should be memorable to your mobile audience.

Related: How Not to Be a Spammer When Marketing Your Business

Remember, your audience is made up of actual people. Think of the last time you texted a friend You probably thought about what they were doing and where they were before you sent the message. Do the same for your audience. Try talking to them like they’re your friends. By keeping in mind that your audience are people, not statistics, you will avoid content that seems spammy to them.

Personalization is possible at scale. Rather than thinking of an individual person, think of the characteristics of the audience you’re trying to reach. If you’re texting young moms, make sure you speak to them like you would speak to young moms.

As a consumer, I view my favorite brands as more than just companies. They’re almost friends. My relationship with them goes way beyond the utility they provide. I can sense their company culture with every interaction. My Jeep is a means of transportation but the fact that other Jeep owners wave to me on the road takes my relationship with the brand to another level.

We all know spam when we see it. You can avoid being “that brand” by making your messages relevant and useful. If you do this, you can stand out from the madding crowd. Your audience will listen to you when you become like a friend.

Related: Five Tips for Better Text-Message Marketing 

More From Entrepreneur

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Apple iPhone 6 expected to include mobile payments, NFC


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.passbook-baseball-tickets-1690610x407.jpg

The iPhone’s Passbook app was a small step by Apple into the mobile-payments world.
James Martin/CNET

There’s more evidence Apple is diving into the world of mobile payments with its next iPhone.

Wired, citing people familiar with the matter, reported Thursday that NFC, or near-field communication, is coming to the hotly anticipated iPhone 6 and will power a new mobile-payment platform on the device. NFC allows for touchless, short-distance interaction between a mobile device and other objects, often used to allow payments at a register or a quick way for one phone to recognize another.

Amid the bevy of iPhone rumors coming out in the run-up to the smartphone’s expected launch on September 9, the NFC prediction was already hinted at last month by other publications.

If these rumors are true, the change could allow Apple to catch up to its chief rival, Samsung, in offering the technology. A few years ago, Samsung highlighted the absence of NFC in iPhones when trying to pitch its Galaxy smartphones. Many of Samsung’s Galaxy phones can share content such as photos or a music playlist by simply bumping the backs of the phones together. NFC can also be used to pair smartphones to other devices, such as cameras and wireless headphones and speakers, simply by placing a phone in close proximity to compatible devices.

Wired reports a new mobile-payment platform will be one of the “hallmark features” of the new device.

While Apple doesn’t offer much so far in mobile payments, the company did take a small step in that direction with Passbook, a service launched in 2012 that brought together a person’s loyalty cards, coupons, and event tickets on the iPhone. Passbook doesn’t include debit or credit card payment features.

Among the other rumored upgrades, most industry watchers expect the next iPhone to have two display sizes, a 4.7-inch model and a 5.5-inch model, larger than the latest 4-inch iPhone 5C and 5S phones. That new feature, again, is seen as an attempt to match other smartphone makers such as Samsung, which have been moving into larger displays in their newer models.

Apple declined to comment.

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T-Mobile will bring HTC’s One M8 for Windows home for the holidays


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Whether you’ve deleted everything on your memory card or there’s been a data corruption, here’s a way to recover those photos.

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Deutsche Telekom Said Open to T-Mobile Talks at $35/Share

Deutsche Telekom AG (DTE) is willing to negotiate a sale of its T-Mobile US Inc. (TMUS) unit, the fourth-largest wireless carrier in the U.S., if an offer values the business at $35 a share or more, according to a person with knowledge of the matter.

Senior managers of Deutsche Telekom discussed T-Mobile’s valuation at a strategy meeting in Berlin yesterday, said the person, who asked not to be identified because the deliberations are confidential. T-Mobile, which rejected a $33-a-share bid by France’s Iliad SA (ILD) this month, hasn’t received an increased offer, the person said.

Deutsche Telekom’s valuation of T-Mobile opens the door for an improved bid from Iliad or new proposals from potential suitors such as Dish Network Corp. (DISH) after Sprint Corp. this month withdrew from talks to buy the unit. While T-Mobile has added millions of customers under Chief Executive Officer John Legere, holding on to the business carries risks for its parent. T-Mobile must compete with ATT Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc. in spectrum auctions later this year and in 2015 and has to keep up spending to upgrade its network.

T-Mobile rose 1.4 percent yesterday to $29.84, valuing the Bellevue, Washington-based company at $24.1 billion. They had gained as much as 6.6 percent earlier in the day. Deutsche Telekom owns 67 percent of T-Mobile.






Photographer: Hannelore Foerster/Bloomberg

Timotheus Hoettges, chief financial officer of Deutsche Telekom AG. Close

Timotheus Hoettges, chief financial officer of Deutsche Telekom AG.

Open

Photographer: Hannelore Foerster/Bloomberg

Timotheus Hoettges, chief financial officer of Deutsche Telekom AG.

Stand-Alone Value

Dish climbed 0.2 percent to $64.73. Deutsche Telekom closed 0.9 percent lower in Frankfurt before the news, while Iliad lost 1.2 percent to 167.65 euros in Paris.

Philipp Kornstaedt, a spokesman for Bonn-based Deutsche Telekom, declined to comment. He reiterated CEO Timotheus Hoettges’s Aug. 7 remarks that any offer would have to exceed T-Mobile’s stand-alone value. An Iliad representative in Paris declined to comment whether the company would improve its bid. Bob Toevs, a Dish spokesman, declined to comment.

T-Mobile’s talks with Sprint failed over conditions for the deal and concern that U.S. regulators won’t approve a combination of the third- and fourth-largest wireless operators in the country.

A deal with Sprint may have valued T-Mobile at about $40 a share, people familiar with the talks said in June. Deutsche Telekom would consider forgoing a higher price if that means avoiding the uncertainty of a prolonged regulatory review of a deal that would reduce the number of nationwide carriers to three from four, other people familiar with the matter have said.

U.S. Kingmakers?

“I’m surprised that Deutsche Telekom would not want north of $40 per share given that they view themselves as the kingmakers of the U.S. wireless market,” said Walt Piecyk, an analyst at BTIG LLC, in an e-mail.

Like T-Mobile, Iliad rattled France’s wireless market with rock-bottom-priced packages that have led to a two-year tariff war with incumbent operators. BNP Paribas SA and HSBC Holdings Plc had agreed to lend Iliad as much as $13 billion to finance its bid, a person with knowledge of the deal has said.

Dish, led by billionaire Chairman Charlie Ergen, is seen by some analysts as a better match for T-Mobile as the Englewood, Colorado-based company could integrate its $26 billion worth of airwaves and national pay-TV service with the carrier.

“Dish can sit and wait to react to whatever bid Iliad can muster,” Piecyk said.

To contact the reporters on this story: Cornelius Rahn in Berlin at crahn2@bloomberg.net; Aaron Kirchfeld in London at akirchfeld@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Kenneth Wong at kwong11@bloomberg.net Crayton Harrison

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Deutsche Telekom could part with T-Mobile for $35 a share


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T-Mobile CEO John Legere has led the company in a turnaround of customer growth.
Lori Grunin/CNET

Deutsche Telekom, the majority owner of T-Mobile, wants to unload its stake in the US wireless carrier. But only at the right price.

The German carrier is willing to negotiate for the sale of T-Mobile if a bid values the company at $35 per share or more, Bloomberg said Thursday, citing unnamed sources. That price isn’t substantially higher than last month’s offer from French telecom company Iliad to buy a majority stake at $33 a share, which T-Mobile rejected.

The business publication also said senior managers for Germany-based Deutsche Telecom discussed T-Mobile’s valuation at a meeting Thursday in Berlin.

T-Mobile and Iliad representatives declined to comment. Representatives for Deutsche Telekom didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Deutsche Telekom has eagerly sought to sell off its ownership in T-Mobile so it can focus on its core business in Europe. T-Mobile has begun to turn some heads under CEO John Legere, who’s paired aggressive pricing plans with a brash style of salesmanship to win over new customers.

Sprint, the third-largest US wireless carrier by subscriber base, was expected to make an offer for T-Mobile, the fourth-largest, in an effort to better compete with the much larger ATT and Verizon. Sprint reportedly withdrew its bid and soon after switched CEOs earlier this month in an apparent sign it was changing direction.

Iliad, which made a surprise bid for T-Mobile before Sprint walked from its offer, had confirmed it made a $15 billion bid for a majority of T-Mobile, though the offer was rebuffed. While T-Mobile has regained its momentum, it still faces tough competition. Sprint, under new CEO Marcelo Claure, appears to be following T-Mobile’s example, offering some similar promotions to lure more customers.

T-Mobile shares are up 2 percent midday at $30.04.

Also from CNET:

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Keeping it Relevant: Simplifying Your Mobile Marketing Initiative

Written on
Aug 28, 2014  Author
Greg Hoy  |

Mobile has changed the game for marketers – it’s more personal than ever. It’s no longer acceptable to be a bullhorn of a company, blasting out messages without taking in to consideration the consumers interests or what they have opt-in to. Content must be a two-way street. Marketing must start with relevancy as its first and last goals. Otherwise you’ll lose your customer.

It’s clear the way consumers engage and make purchases is changing, causing marketers to find a way to interact with them in a personalized and relevant way.

If you aren’t currently engaging your customers through mobile marketing, consider the following:

  • 90% of text messages are opened within the first 90 seconds of arrival.
  • Consumers check their mobile devices an average of 150 times a day.
  • 1/3 of US mobile users prefer brand offers via text.
  • 70% of users consider SMS messages valuable
  • 23% conversion rate for SMS marketing

Even when you take those data points in to account, it doesn’t guarantee marketing success. If your messages don’t resonate with consumers and motivate them to act, then your efforts are pointless.

Here are six tips for writing marketing texts that get read and produce results:

  1. Identify yourself.
 It’s essential that you clearly identify your business or brand to avoid getting the spam treatment. This is one sure step in not getting your message automatically deleted or even worse losing the customer to an opt-out.
  2. No fluff. Your text message should be clear and focused. There’s no room for fluff in mobile marketing. Know who your target audience is and speak directly to them.
  3. Offer something of value. No one wants to receive texts from a company unless the messages offer something of immediate value. Because text messaging is an instantaneous medium, you should include real-time offers. Whether you’re providing information about a sale or a new product, the message should describe the benefits of acting now.
  4. Avoid getting an immediate delete.
 If your text message looks like spam, consumers will delete it without giving it a second thought. Avoid anything that comes across as too promotional. That includes marketing hype like “amazing” offers, slang and text abbreviations.
  5. Personalize it or risk an opt-out. Consumers can handle email clutter, but when it comes to the text messages they receive they are not as forgiving. Instead, make recipients of your texts feel like they’re special and have qualified for an exclusive promotion. Otherwise, they are at risk to opt out of receiving any future texts from you.
  6. Track conversions. Make sure you’re tracking conversions on an individual basis.  Knowing what struck a consumer’s fancy should be leveraged for future mobile communications.  Segmenting your offers by what’s most likely to cause a consumer to move to purchase will move the needle on ROI.

Personalizing your mobile interactions will immediately increase consumer engagement and loyalty with your brand. Mobile marketing and advertising, done with personalization and relevancy in mind, has tremendous potential to reach customers on devices that they always have within arm’s reach.

Greg Hoy is the vice president of mobile solutions at Hipcricket, Inc., bringing over 12 years of mobile industry experience to the company. In his current position, Greg is responsible for the vision and strategy to deliver consumer experiences that increase mobile engagement and lifetime value across mobile messaing, mobile websites, social media and branded apps for Hipcricket. Prior to joining Hipcricket, Greg held a senior product management position at Motricity where he played a key role in market positioning, strategy decisions, and the overall product strategy for their mobile search and messaging products. Greg’s mobile pedigree also includes product and program management roles at ATT and Dwango Wireless. Greg holds a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Washington, and a Bachelor’s degree in Asian studies from Western Washington University.

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Tags: greg hoy, hipcricket, internet-marketing-advertising, mobile, Mobile-Advertising, Mobile-Marketing, online-advertising and revenue


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Is Apple a Major Player in Mobile Payments?

Is Apple a Major Player in Mobile Payments Is Apple a Major Player in Mobile Payments?It’s difficult to find a market in which Apple doesn’t exert tremendous influence, but what about mobile payments?

According to IDC Financial Insights‘ new report, “Business Strategy: Apple and the Payments Tipping Point,” Apple may not yet be a mobile payments behemoth, but the tide could soon be turning.

“The possibility of Apple playing an increasing role in payments, one that leverages its entire ecosystem of online digital stores, brick-and-mortar retail outlets, and line of mobile devices to facilitate payments, has spurred considerable interest and debate within the payment community and tech press,” the report summary reads. “The question then is what does Apple stand to gain? And more importantly, what does Apple’s presence in the payment landscape mean for retailers, banks, processors, and other stakeholders?”

Based on the projections made, IDC believes that Apple’s solution, regardless of how it develops, will be aimed at making Apple’s devices more competitive, not disrupting the current payment market.

Apple’s entrance in payments will help the entire mobile payment space, creating a tipping point for the adoption of mobile payments for both consumers and merchants.

“Apple has been actively involved in making payments more convenient and streamlined for consumers who use its device,” said James Wester, IDC practice director for Worldwide Payment Strategies and author of the report. “Apple’s unique role as a device manufacturer, OS provider, and online retailer means Apple has the ability to impact the way payments evolve like few other companies. Merchants, issuers, processors, and other payment stakeholders will need to understand that impact and begin adjusting their investments and strategies accordingly.”

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